Winter is here; are your animals ready?

Winter is ruled by the water element, which is associated with the kidneys, bladder, and adrenal glands.

 

During the winter months it is important to nurture and nourish kidney Qi.

by Beth Pelosa (RMSAAM Animal Acupressure Massage Instructor)

Winter is Yin in nature; it is inactive, cold, and damp. Winter is the time to be restful, and consolidate your Qi through the season, until the season of birth and energy in the spring.  Winter is ruled by the water element, which is associated with the kidneys, bladder, and adrenal glands. Traditional Chinese Medicine theory indicates the kidneys are considered the source of all energy or Qi within the body. They store all of the reserve Qiin the body so that it can be used in times of stress and change, to heal, or prevent illness. During the winter months it is important to nurture and nourish kidney Qi. It is the time when this energy can be most easily depleted.  Our animal’s bodies are instinctively expressing the fundamental principles of winter – rest, conservation, and storage. Did you notice the winter coats?  Are your animals resting more, eating more, or putting on weight?  In order to help animals through winter and protect them from the invasion of cold and damp associated with winter, I recommend a Winter Qi Warming Acupressure Session, be performed on healthy animals each month from now until spring. With older or weak animals, I recommend a weekly acupressure session.

Practitioners, it’s a great time to talk to your clients about acupressure to maintain their animals optimal health, through winter.

First open the Bladder meridian three times, on both sides of the animal. Tonify the following points on the left side of the animal, and then the right, using your thumb in a clockwise motion, until the animal releases (licks, chews, yawns, drops head, stretches, or will pass gas):

Ki 3 ~ The Source Point for the Kidney, to regulate and tonify the Kidney

Sp 6 ~ Three Yin Meeting, to tonifiy Yin, and clears Damp

St 36 ~ To strengthen the Stomach and Qi

Bl 25 ~ Association Point for Large Intestine, dries damp-cold especially Large Intestine

If the animal is restless in winter due to less exercise or activity add Ht 7 to calm the spirit. When you have completed the point work, close the Bladder meridian three times on each side.

Beth is a Certified Large and Small Animal Acupressure Practitioner, Animal Acupressure Instructor, and owner of Equine Energy Works, LLC. In addition to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and Acupressure, Beth has also studied Dr. McLaren’s Photonic Light Therapy and other vibrational healing modalities including equine massage, Bach Flower Remedies therapy, floral acupressure and aromatherapy. Beth believes in a balanced approach to animal health care including good nutritional support, exercise, natural training techniques and regular preventative maintenance acupressure and vibrational energy work. Beth’s passion is teaching animal owners and caregivers TCM and animal acupressure to help them support their animal’s health and experience the strong bond and cooperative partnership energy work creates with animals.

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