Spring is Here, Stop Hibernating, and Let’s Not Get Angry!

A wood imbalance can lead to spinal problems, poor flexibility, arthritis and eye problems.
A wood imbalance can lead to spinal problems, poor flexibility, arthritis and eye problems.

 

by Beth Pelosa (RMSAAM Animal Acupressure Level 1, and Level 2 instructor.)

Spring is a happy time. The spring grass is emerging, and the animals love the return of longer days of sunshine, and warmth of the spring air. But according to Traditional Chinese Medicine, being angry is exactly what we can expect of our animals if we don’t balance their Wood element.

In TCM, spring is represented by the wood element.  Wood represents birth and newness. Wood governs the spine, joints, muscles, ligaments and tendons, and the eyes.  A wood imbalance can lead to spinal problems, poor flexibility, arthritis and eye problems.

But most important for the emotions, wood governs the liver.  The Liver meridian is responsible for the smooth flow of Qi (energy) and smooth flowing Qi means health and vitality.  The emotion associated with the liver, and the wind of spring, is Anger.  If your animal’s liver is imbalanced their Qi will be disrupted and they can become irritable and even angry.

A spring acupuncture practice of balancing the wood element and caring for your liver will make for a happier and healthier spring! So spring into action and give yourself, your animals, and your clients’ animals a Spring Acupressure Session.

Massage the following points clockwise with your thumb, for thirty seconds on the right of  side of the animal, and then do the same on the left.

  • Liv3 , the Source Point of the Liver Meridian, to promote the smooth flow of Qi,  and balance the emotions.
  • LI11, to help support the immune system. Extremely, helpful for animals with allergies.
  • Sp6, Three Yin meeting to promote Yin energy, and balance Kidney, Liver, and Spleen.

In addition, this is the time to increase our animal’s activity. Your animals need to come out of hibernation. Walk your dogs more often. If your horses have been off work all winter, start doing your ground work, and light riding. The increase in activity will be helpful for them, and you!

Do not perform acupressure on pregnant animals. Acupressure is not a substitute for veterinary medicine.

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