Up to my chin

Oh me, oh my, Oh how the snow grows tall... (Image: Sandi Martinez)
Oh me, oh my, Oh how the snow grows tall… (Image: Sandi Martinez)

by Sandi Martinez

Oh how the snow grows tall

I wag my tail and it drags

Across the frozen ground

Oh, my coat is covered in snow

And my paws too

How to get warm,

And stay warm?

Please, give me tons of blankets

A sweater and coat

And those cute snow shoes

Just because I’m a dog

Doesn’t mean those I couldn’t use

Oh, and a nice massage

Yes… right there near the shoulder blades

And around my belly

Thank you my dear human

I am all ears as you tell me your troubles

And you rub me behind my ears and remember

To fill my bowl with unfrozen water

And a bit more food too…

Why? Because that’s what humans do

For their animal counter-parts and because I love you too,

Thank you for extra love and kisses because this winter hasn’t even begun

And the snow is up to my chin!

Fall into Grace

Fall is the time when we ask ourselves, I’m ready for that change, but am I ready to make the jump? (Image: Sandi Martinez)
Fall is the time when we ask ourselves, I’m ready for that change, but am I ready to make the jump? (Image: Sandi Martinez)

by Sandi Martinez

Fall is a time of preparing for the quiet, and stillness that winter brings. It is a time when we take stock of what we have, what we’ve had, and do we want to have it into the future? Do we need it? If we keep it, where will we put it?

Fall is the time when we ask ourselves, I’m ready for that change, but am I ready to make the jump? Fall is when we risk tripping the most – leaves, twigs, and the unexpected. It is an intricate time; summer is ending, winter is around the corner. If we wait too long, it gets too cold, and if we don’t do it during the summer, it’s too late. But as we get closer to our deepest desires and the things that will make us ecstatically happy, one thing is clear – we are much more courageous than we give ourselves credit for. It’s the beginning of a transformative time when we can ask these questions, and truly want answers. Whether or not we are mentally, physically, spiritually, or psychologically ready for answers. It is a time when we can honestly be given credit to having some grace amid chaos, confusion, doubt, or stagnation.

Perhaps it’s during these times when we tell ourselves, if I must trip, then I will land gracefully

On the other hand, tripping may not even happen. Fears have a way of tricking us into staying in stagnation mode. Ego plays its role by feeding us negativity and pointing out all the things that can go wrong. Ego also plays a part in telling us we don’t deserve to be happy.

But RMSAAM congratulates you; you are on the first steps; the right path, to following your heart. There is no greater joy, no greater satisfaction than being the conduit in which humankind, teams up to blaze new trails in creating health, well-being, and unconditional love to animal-kind. So, will you keep looking at the clock or calendar, and asking when is the right time to do this? When we listen to our heart, the only right time, is the time we heed its call.

A small rescue with HUGE results

I wonder who actually rescued who on that Saturday. (Image: Sandi Martinez)
I wonder who actually rescued who on that Saturday. (Image: Sandi Martinez)

 

 

By Sandi Martinez

The weekends are days we usually take care of things that get backed up during the week, things we forgot to do during the week, and things that we do just for weekend’s sake! In the midst of going, going, going, and gone… we sometimes run into a bit of a surprise along the way.

So on my way home after running errands on a fated Saturday, September 27, just last month, with the help of my mother, we spotted a tiny dog trying to cross a busy interstate, in a small line-up of villages called, Chile. You Chile lovers out there, I’m talking about Chile, New Mexico… And yes, for your information, there is plenty of Chile that has been harvested, roasted, and prepped to sell in pounds, Ristras, and… Oh, wait, I’m talking about my small rescue!

So, my mother gasps, and says, ‘Poor little dog, it’s going to get run over!’ and I say, “What? Where?” I’m driving, mind you, so my mind is on the road, yet, it’s not – because I just didn’t see the dog. So she points across the median, where the brave little dog has made it safely and barely across successfully – alive. Worse yet, it could have been me that might have taken her life.

I finally see the little dog, zig-zagging around the median trying to figure out what to do next. I make a U-turn at my next opportunity, swing around, get out of my car, and walk carefully over to the sweetest little brown and white-spotted Chihuahua I think I’ve ever seen. I call to the pup (I can see the dog is still very young) and call out softly and reach down to pet comfort the frightened dog. By some miracle, she stays still. I am able to pick her up and carry her over to the car where my mother gently holds the darling pup. Before we drive off, we ascertain the pup is female. I point my car towards home; the dog is coming with me.

She is terrified; shaking and somewhat sluggish either from exhaustion and trauma, hunger, or thirst, or all of the above.

I wait a few days, and take the pup in to the local animal shelter to see if anyone has tried to claim her by putting up a flier. No one has claimed her, she is not chipped, and so therefore, on that fated Saturday, after seven months of pining away in grief for my dog Samson, who I lost back in February of this year, I now have a new companion, who I never expected and have fallen deeply in love with, Azra.

I wonder who actually rescued who on that Saturday.  RMSAAM wants to hear your rescue stories, so please, share them with us!

Taking Better Photographs of your Dog

By Deandra Walker

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I love it when my dog is acting cute or silly and I am able to capture a photograph of it. I like to use my camera phone, and I am sure you do as well. Unlike my digital camera, I always have my phone with me making it easier to snap photos of those special moments. However, I have noticed that the photos from my camera phone do not turn out quite as well as I hope or my subject decides to move and chase the squirrel running across my yard. So how can we improve the way we take pictures of our dogs using our cell phones?

Camera phones are continually evolving, becoming of higher quality all of the time. And, they are so easy to use! Here are some tips for getting those photos to show off your dog and his or her unique personality.

  1. Turn the flash off to avoid creating red eye. The flash can also startle your dog. Always try to use natural light instead.
  2. Make sure that you focus on you dog’s head. These days, smart phones have the capability for you to select the subjects in your picture you want to focus on.
  3. Get down to eye level to take the photograph; it is more flattering for your dog.
  4. Offer treats to your dog get you’re his attention.
  5. Use the rapid-fire option if you catch your pet doing something cute. That way your phone takes pictures continuously and you have a better chance of capturing a good shot.
  6. Try to take photo early in the morning or just before sunset. These are the times during the day when natural light is perfect for photography.
  7. Turn your pet’s face toward the sun when outdoors so their expression is bright and visible.

Follow these suggestions and you will have better luck snapping an adorable photo of your pet. If you take a good shot, email it to us at info@rmsaam.com and we will put it up on our Facebook page. Whoever gets the most comments/likes between today,  September 9th and 5pm MST on September 16th, will win a prize!

Acupressure for Canine Hip Dysplasia

Use the acupressure points below, every day, for dogs with Hip Dysplasia and weekly, for dogs with a predisposition to Hip Dysplasia or any signs of hind end pain or lameness.
Use these acupressure points every day, for dogs with Hip Dysplasia and weekly, for dogs with a predisposition to Hip Dysplasia or any signs of hind end pain or lameness.

By Beth Pelosa

(RMSAAMs Animal Acupressure Course Instructor)

Canine Hip Dysplasia is the most common cause of rear leg lameness in dogs. The highest incidence occurs in the larger breeds, such as St. Bernard’s, Newfoundland’s, Rottweiler’s, Golden Retrievers, German Shepherd Dogs, and Labrador Retrievers.

The hip is a ball-and-socket joint; the head of the femur meets with the pelvis at the acetabulum, forming the hip joint. (The acetabulum is a concave surface of the pelvis.)  In dogs, hip dysplasia is an abnormal formation of the hip socket causing a loose joint that in its more severe form, can  cause crippling lameness over time, and painful arthritis of the joints. Instability occurs as muscle development lags behind the rate of skeletal growth. As the stress of weight-bearing exceeds the strength limits of the supporting connective tissue and muscle, the joint becomes loose and unstable. This allows for free play of the femoral head in the acetabulum, which promotes abnormal wear and tear, and can lead to discomfort, pain, arthritis, and lameness.

Acupressure cannot correct the genetic defect of the hip structure, but it can help minimize the progression of deterioration of the joint and help minimize the symptoms.

Use the acupressure points below, every day, for dogs with Hip Dysplasia and weekly, for dogs with a predisposition to Hip Dysplasia or any signs of hind end pain or lameness.

Massage these points clockwise first on the right side  until the dog has a energy release such as a yawn, licking, a bark, a stretch, or any obvious sign of relaxation, but for no more than 30 seconds. Repeat on the left side.

  • St 36- To maintain proper weight, and promote overall wellness
  • BL11 – To promote strong bones
  • Sp3- To promote good muscle strength
  • BL54- MASTER Point for Back and Hip
  • Sp6- Kidney, Liver, and Spleen Yin Balancing Point
  • GB34- Strengthens Tendons
  • LI4 Can be used separately or in conjunction with the other points for Pain or to prevent Pain

About Beth Pelosa:

Beth is a Certified Large and Small Animal Acupressure Practitioner, Animal Acupressure Instructor, and owner of Equine Energy Works, LLC. In addition to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and Acupressure, Beth has also studied Dr. McLaren’s Photonic Light Therapy and other vibrational healing modalities including equine massage, Bach Flower Remedies therapy, floral acupressure and aromatherapy. To read more about Beth, click here, and if you’d like to know when the upcoming Acupressure courses are going to be held, you click on the calendar. We look forward to meeting you!

World of WE

...laughter unbound a jewel on the crown of your smile every mile... (Image: Sandi Martinez)
…laughter unbound
a jewel on the crown
of your smile every mile… (Image: Sandi Martinez)

by Sandi Martinez

 

We walk together in silence

we nod exuberantly

as we pass trees,

and bees feed on these,

Budding buds as we cross

each other’s paths

the flower smiles and leans

drinking up the sun

dripping its nectar on all but one

You and me,

walking together in silence

and yet I can hear your joy

your laughter unbound

a jewel on the crown

of your smile

every mile

It

Is

The

World

Of

WE,

You and me

Thunderstorms Oh My!

By Deandra Walker

We have been having an unusual amount of rain in Colorado this summer. With rain comes thunder and lightning, and the reminder of how much anxiety it can cause our dogs (and ourselves as well). And everyone has his or her favorite thunderstorm story. In many instances, dogs that are fearful of thunderstorms also experience stress with other loud noises like fireworks, gunshots, garbage trucks, and airplanes. The good news, however, is that dogs can benefit from calming therapies in these instances. For example, soft music, flower essences, and acupressure and massage can all be helpful in alleviating your dog’s stress in these situations.

Both acupressure and massage are effective tools in soothing and relaxing muscles and they work well in conjunction with soft music in a quite, peaceful, and safe area of the home. A good place to begin is by gently stroking your pet from head to tail in long, slow, strokes to relax them until they feel comfortable enough to lie down. To massage, create small, circular movements from head to tail along the sides the spine making sure to massage either side of the body equally as well as the base of the skull for energy balance. Acupressure is also a great choice to help calm a distressed and frightened pet. After massaging, apply light pressure to the area in the center of the skull between the ears.

It is essential that you remain cautious when working with animals that are scared as even the sweetest pets can act on impulse in situations that cause them anxiety and stress. Approach your pet gently and slowly and always pay close attention to their body language.

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