Who Opened the Gate for that Dog?

Untitled

Written by Beth Pelosa

The 4 gates is an acupuncture point combination consisting of 2 different points; Liver 3 and Large Intestine 4, stimulated at the same time bilaterally. Since acupressure practitioners only have two hands, and don’t use needles, the gates are opened one side of the body at a time.

Liver 3 is a source point. It is known among practitioners as the most important point for stagnation of the inner body. Liv3 is helpful in animals to disperse stagnant liver energy and harmonize the liver energy. Liv 3 is known to help with detoxification, calming effect on the nervous system to alleviate restlessness, irritability, stress, and anxiety, low back pain. This point gets energy moving!   Liv 3 on a dog is located on the medial aspect of the 2nd toe, located between the 1st and 2nd metatarsal bones.

Large Intestine 4 is a source point. Large Intestine 4 balances the Large Intestine meridian. It is helpful when used to strengthen the immune system, helps reduce skin irritations, allergies, to clear heat and inflammation , to help any type of problem with the face which including TMJ. It is used for PAIN anywhere in the body. LI 4 on a dog is located in the webbing of the dew claw.

Together, these points circulate the free flow of qi and blood through the body. They help to open all the meridians, increase circulation, and decrease pain anywhere in the body. The 4 Gates can also be used for animals rescued from abuse to help release emotional issues such as feelings of being trapped or stuck in a situation.

Stimulate both points of the right side of the dog for 30 seconds, or less if you get a release, such as a lick, chew, yawn bark, or passing gas. Repeat on the right side.

Your dog will be happy you opened the gates!

If you are interested in becoming a Large and or Small Animal Massage or Acupressure practitioner, go to the Rocky Mountain School of Animal Acupressure website for practitioner course information and dates www.rmsaam.com.

For private acupressure sessions for your dog or horse contact Beth Pelosa, Certified Large and Small Animal Massage and Acupressure Practitioner, and RMSAAM’s Animal Acupressure Instructor.

For an appointment or more information, Beth can be contacted at: 303-746-7786 bpelosa@rmhhai.org or visit Beth’s website Rocky Mountain Holistic Healing Arts Institute and sign up for her free newsletter, and receive 6 free online human and animal acupressure lessons. www.rmhhai.org

Advertisements

Acupressure for Canine Hip Dysplasia

Use the acupressure points below, every day, for dogs with Hip Dysplasia and weekly, for dogs with a predisposition to Hip Dysplasia or any signs of hind end pain or lameness.
Use these acupressure points every day, for dogs with Hip Dysplasia and weekly, for dogs with a predisposition to Hip Dysplasia or any signs of hind end pain or lameness.

By Beth Pelosa

(RMSAAMs Animal Acupressure Course Instructor)

Canine Hip Dysplasia is the most common cause of rear leg lameness in dogs. The highest incidence occurs in the larger breeds, such as St. Bernard’s, Newfoundland’s, Rottweiler’s, Golden Retrievers, German Shepherd Dogs, and Labrador Retrievers.

The hip is a ball-and-socket joint; the head of the femur meets with the pelvis at the acetabulum, forming the hip joint. (The acetabulum is a concave surface of the pelvis.)  In dogs, hip dysplasia is an abnormal formation of the hip socket causing a loose joint that in its more severe form, can  cause crippling lameness over time, and painful arthritis of the joints. Instability occurs as muscle development lags behind the rate of skeletal growth. As the stress of weight-bearing exceeds the strength limits of the supporting connective tissue and muscle, the joint becomes loose and unstable. This allows for free play of the femoral head in the acetabulum, which promotes abnormal wear and tear, and can lead to discomfort, pain, arthritis, and lameness.

Acupressure cannot correct the genetic defect of the hip structure, but it can help minimize the progression of deterioration of the joint and help minimize the symptoms.

Use the acupressure points below, every day, for dogs with Hip Dysplasia and weekly, for dogs with a predisposition to Hip Dysplasia or any signs of hind end pain or lameness.

Massage these points clockwise first on the right side  until the dog has a energy release such as a yawn, licking, a bark, a stretch, or any obvious sign of relaxation, but for no more than 30 seconds. Repeat on the left side.

  • St 36- To maintain proper weight, and promote overall wellness
  • BL11 – To promote strong bones
  • Sp3- To promote good muscle strength
  • BL54- MASTER Point for Back and Hip
  • Sp6- Kidney, Liver, and Spleen Yin Balancing Point
  • GB34- Strengthens Tendons
  • LI4 Can be used separately or in conjunction with the other points for Pain or to prevent Pain

About Beth Pelosa:

Beth is a Certified Large and Small Animal Acupressure Practitioner, Animal Acupressure Instructor, and owner of Equine Energy Works, LLC. In addition to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and Acupressure, Beth has also studied Dr. McLaren’s Photonic Light Therapy and other vibrational healing modalities including equine massage, Bach Flower Remedies therapy, floral acupressure and aromatherapy. To read more about Beth, click here, and if you’d like to know when the upcoming Acupressure courses are going to be held, you click on the calendar. We look forward to meeting you!

Winter is the season of the Water Element

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

by Beth Pelosa (RMSAAM Large and Small Animal Acupressure Instructor)

Ocean in bubbleWater energy is a strong energy force centered in the lower belly. When the Kidney Qi is strong, an animal can be very determined, fearless and willing to work hard. Strong will power is characteristic of animal with strong Kidney Qi. Longevity is also considered to be associated with healthy Kidney Qi.

When the Kidney Qi is weak, there can be problems with water metabolism, hydration, urination, and fertility. Animals with Kidney Qi imbalance can be anxious, fearful, and withdrawn, or hyper-vigilant. Animals can become dehydrated, or have edemas. Dogs with Kidney Qi imbalance can become fear-biters, and horses can become unsafe “spooky” mounts. Kidney Qi declines with aging, and animals especially those who are kept outside for the winter need to have strong Kidney Qi to help them stay warm and healthy during this cold season.

In order to prepare your animals for winter, young animals can be given a Winter Acupressure Session, one to two times a month starting now, through the winter. Older animals may benefit from a weekly session.

FIRST- Tonify Ki 3  with your thumb, by rubbing the point gently clockwise on the right side of the dog until the dog has a release of energy*, such as licking, yawning, barking, stretching or moving away from touch.

NEXT- Repeat on Left side of dog

NEXT- Tonify ST36  with your thumb, by rubbing the point gently clockwise on the right side of the dog until the dog has a release of energy.

NEXT- Repeat on Left side of dog

NEXT- Tonify  LI 11 with your thumb, by rubbing the point gently clockwise on the right side of the dog until the dog has a release of energy,

NEXT- Repeat on Left side of dog

*Note if the dog does not have an obvious release of energy, stimulate the point for 30 seconds, and move to the next point.

*You can also use the same points on a horse.

Learn more about these, and other powerful acupressure point groups, in RMSAAM’s Animal Acupressure Courses.

Give your dog a “Protective Metal Coat” for winter!

Give Your Dog a Powerful Acupressure Treatment to Boost Their “Protective Metal” in preparation for winter.
Give Your Dog a Powerful Acupressure Treatment to Boost Their “Protective Metal” in preparation for winter.

by Beth Pelosa (RMSAAM’s Animal Acupressure Instructor)

Master Points are Powerful Acupressure Points used to balance energy and resolve many physical and emotional issues. There are 6 Master Points.  Master Points are often used to affect specific anatomical regions on the animal’s body.  These points are located near the carpals on the forelegs and near the stifle on the hind legs.

Acupoint

Affected Anatomical Region

Lu 7

Head and Neck

LI 4

Face and Mouth

St 36

Abdomen and Gastrointestinal Tract

Sp 6

The urogenital systems and the rear abdomen

Bl 40

Back and hips

Pe 6

Chest and front portion of the abdomen

Give Your Dog a Powerful Acupressure Treatment to Boost Their “Protective Metal” in preparation for winter.

FIRST- Tonify L1 4 with your thumb, by rubbing the point gently clockwise on the right side of the dog,

until the dog has a release of energy*, such as licking, yawning, barking, stretching or moving away from touch.

NEXT: Repeat on Left side of dog.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Next- Tonify Lu 7 with your thumb, by rubbing the point gently clockwise on the right side of the dog until the dog has a release of energy.

NEXT: Repeat on Left side of dog.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Next- Tonify ST36 with your thumb, by rubbing the point gently clockwise on the right side of the dog until the dog has a release of energy.

NEXT: Repeat on left side of dog.

*Note if the dog does not have an obvious release of energy, stimulate the point for 30 seconds, and move to the next point.

*You can also use the same Master Point treatment on your horse.

Learn more about these, and other powerful acupressure point groups, in RMSAAM’s Animal Acupressure Courses.